main conference Program

Conference Track Key:

 TX – TreatmentREC – Recovery & CommunityML – Military 
RG – Responsible GamblingPX – PreventionSP – Sports

Thursday, July 21, 2022

CE’s

Time

Track

Session Details

N/A
8:30 AM – 8:45 AM
Welcome
ALLWelcome
0.75
8:45 AM – 9:30 AM
General Session 
ALL

Consider This: 50 Years of Problem Gambling Treatment and Research

Heather Chapman, PhD, ICGC-II, BACC

1
9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
Breakout Session 1
TX

Gambling Disorder and Trauma: Comparing Seeking Safety to CBT

David Ledgerwood, PhD

REC

Hearing the Voices of Gambling Disorder

Marc Lefkowitz, ICGC-II

ML

Gambling Problems Among Veterans: Risks, Reach, and Revolution 

Nathan Smith, PhD; David Yeager

RG

Legislating For the Future: NCLGS Responsible Gambling Resolution

Hon. Christie Carpino; Hon. Karen Carter Peterson; Marlene Warner

1.5
9:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Prevention Showcase
PX

CampusCENTS

James Syphax

Adolescent Problem Gambling Prevention Curriculum in a Learning Management System

Alison Drain

Engaging Prevention Professionals in a Treatment-Focused Fellowship Program

Cory Brown

No Need to Master Every Topic, But Master Collaboration!

Michael Buzzelli

A D.I.Y. (Do It Yourself) Approach to Underage and Problem Gambling Awareness: Engaging Community Organizations through the Use of Toolkit Guides

Heather Eshleman

Gambling and Comorbidities

Mina Hazar; Adela Colhon

0.5
10:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Break & Poster Sessions
ALL

Poster Sessions

Greed in Relation to Problem Gambling: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

Uibin Lee; Devin Mills, PhD; Kelly M. Chroback, PhD


Differences in the History Gambling Treatment Utilization for Latinos and Whites

Abraham Caballero

National Problem Gambling Helpline – Solving the Puzzle of Modernization

Jaime Costello

1
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
BREAKOUT Session 2
TX

Gambling Among Medicated-Assistant Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder: Are We Ignoring Gambling?

Andrew Schreier, ICGC-I

REC

The Work of the UK’s Commission on Crime and Gambling-Related Harms

Sarah Ramanauskas

ML

The Impact Military Culture has on Problem Gambling Within the Military and Veteran Communities

Jonathan Crandall; David Yeager

RG

Beyond Just “What Good Looks Like”: A U.S. Operators’ Response

Chrissy Thurmond; Julie Hynes, IGDC 

PX

Prevention of Digital Addictions for Children Living with ADHD: A Care Giver’s Experience Unfolded

Alison Drain; Stephanie Diez-Morel, PhD, ICGC-II, BACC

 N/A
12:00 PM – 12:45 PM
Lunch
ALLLunch
0.75
12:45 PM – 1:30 PM
General Session
ALL

Say It Loud, I’m Black and I’m Proud!! An Unfinished Lifetime Empowering Healing for People Who Gamble and Cultural Communities

Deborah Haskins, PhD, ICGC-II, BACC

1
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
BREAKOUT Session 3
TX

Weaving Together A Blanket of Hope & Help Engaging Organizations to Integrate Problem Gambling Screening into Existing Paradigm

Kristen Beall, ICGC-I

REC

Harm Reduction – Embracing the Change One Case at a Time

Shirley Hoak, JD, ICGC-II

ML

Impact Problem Gambling has on the Military Family & Loved Ones

David Yeager; Shawna Black; Brianne Doura-Schawohl; Rich Taylor; Amanda Winters

RG

Responsible Gambling Implications & Applications for Lotteries

Marlene Warner; Charles McIntyre; Greg Smith

PX

The Blurred Lines of Gambling and Day Trading

Daniel Trolaro

0.5
2:30 PM – 3:00 PM
Break & Poster Sessions
ALL

Poster Sessions

At-Risk and Problem Gambling Among Veterans with Serious Mental Illness

Joseph Deckro; Kendra Pugh

Problem Gambling and Gaming in the Hierarchical Structure of Psychopathology

Jeremie Richard

National Problem Gambling Helpline – Solving the Puzzle of Modernization

Jaime Costello

1
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
BREAKOUT Session 4
TX

Daring Conversations About Identity

Sarah Prager, ICGC-I; John Bundrick, ICGC-II, BACC

REC

Inclusion of Gambling Awareness in Student News Program

Kaitlin Brown, ICGC-II, IGDC, BACC; Kelly Leppard

ML

Veteran Opportunities for Gambling Treatment – How Can I Connect Them?

Tammy Reiff, ICGC-II

RG

Best RG Practices for Tribal Operators in Internet-Based Gaming

Raquel Buari, JD

PX

Working in Diverse Communities

Maria Garner, ICGC-II; George Hicks

1
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
BREAKOUT Session 5
TX

Massachusetts Technical Assistance Center (M-TAC): Infusing Innovation to Enhance Problem Gambling Treatment Capacity

Debi LaPlante, PhD; Victor Ortiz; Heather M. Gray, PhD; Amanda Ayers

REC

Learning Lessons? The British Experimentation with the Liberalization of Gambling

Heather Wardle, PhD

ML

Creating National Awareness for Military Personnel & Veterans with Gambling Problems: Challenges & Opportunities

Rich Taylor; Kevin Wensing

RG

Innovative Solutions That Make Player Protection and Safer Gaming Attainable Today

Nick Hill; Paul Foster

PX

Impacts of COVID-19 on Problem Gambling Services: Findings from the 2021 NAADGS National Survey

Jeff Marotta, PhD, ICGC-II; Linda Graves, PsyD, ICGC-II

N/A
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM 
Highlight Event
ALL

Highlight Event at the Boston Tea Party Museum

Friday, July 22, 2022

CE’s

Time

Track

Session Details

N/A
8:30 AM – 8:45 AM
Welcome
ALLWelcome
0.25
8:45 AM – 9:00 AM
General Session 
ALL

Massachusetts Council on Gaming and Health Alumni Introductions

Marlene Warner

0.75
9:00 AM – 9:45 AM
General Session 
ALL

Reflections on Risk

Rachel Volberg, PhD

1
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
BREAKOUT Session 6
TX

Treating Problem Gamblers & Partners Using A Polyvagal Theory (PVT) & Adaptive Information Processing (AIP) Informed Approach

Suzanne Koch Eckenrode, ICGC-II

REC

Culture of Caring: A Tribal Values-Driven Responsible Gaming Program

Jennifer Shatley, PhD; Jacob Coin

SP

Educating Young Sports Bettors: The FanDuel Approach

Adam Warrington; Craig Carton

RG

Collaboration and Partnership: Expanding the Lens of Responsible Gambling

Victor Ortiz; Lorena Lama; Christian Teja

PX

Conducting an Underage and Problem Gambling Prevention Needs Assessment

Heather Eshleman

0.5
10:45 AM – 11:15 AM
Break & Poster Sessions
ALL

Poster Sessions

Eliciting Unique, Individualized Treatment Plans for Sports Bettors in Outpatient Treatment

Daniel Field; David Leong

Reframing Recovery: Realigning the Message to Reach the Right Audience

Vena Schexnayder

National Problem Gambling Helpline – Solving the Puzzle of Modernization

Jaime Costello

1
11:15 AM – 12:15 PM
BREAKOUT Session 7
TX

Beyond Loot Boxes: The Convergence of Gaming & Gambling

Jody Bechtold, ICGC-II, BACC; Stephanie Diez-Morel, PhD, ICGC-II, BACC

REC

Non-Anon: Recovery in the Public Eye

Kitty Martz; Christina Cook

SP

Perspectives on the Impact of Sports Betting on Mind, Body and Brain

Tim Fong, MD

RG

Asian Outreach: Inside the Casino & Outside in the Community

Linh Ho; Vivian Xu

PX

Unpacking the Root Causes of Problem Gambling in the Asian Community

Heang Rubin, PhD; Yoyo Yau; Mia Colby; Ben Hires

 N/A
12:15 PM – 1:30 PM
Lunch
ALLNational Awards Lunch
1
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
BREAKOUT Session 8
TX

From Gambling 101 to Supervision and Fellowship Programs: Ohio’s Approach to Building Treatment Workforce

Michael Buzzelli; Cory Brown

REC

Integrating Telephone Recovery Support into the Voluntary Self Exclusion Process in Massachusetts

Odessa Dwarika; Jodie Nealley

SP

College Student Athletes’ Gambling Behaviors: A Look at Changes in Sports Wagering from 2004-2020

Jeffrey L. Derevensky, PhD

RG

A Baseline Survey of Jackpot Winners at Three MGM Properties: A Study of Sustainability & Risk

Sasha Stark, PhD

PX

Agility Grants: Innovation and Amplification in Gambling Prevention

Elizabeth Thielen; Wiley D. Harwell, D. Min., ICGC-II

1
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
BREAKOUT Session 9
TX

Providing Evidence-Based and Current Treatment and Training: The Practice of Letting Go and Beginners Mind

Lori Rugle, PhD, ICGC-II, BACC; Wiley Harwell, ICGC-II

REC

2021 Statewide Assessment of Gambling and Problem Gambling in Illinois

Hannah Carliner, PhD; Allyson Auerbach; Jim Wilkerson

SP

A Strategic Framework for Sports Wagering

Mark Vander Linden; Marie-Claire Flores Pajot

RG

Responsible Gaming Features in a Growing Digital Environment

Jade Luchauer; Jesse Saccoccio

PX

Key Lessons from Responsible Drinking Programming and Partnerships

Adam Warrington

0.5
3:30 PM – 4:00 PM
Break & Poster Session
ALL 

Poster Session

Patterns of Community Gambling on Lottery by Zip-Code in Massachusetts

Kendra Pugh

National Problem Gambling Helpline – Solving the Puzzle of Modernization

Jaime Costello

1
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
BREAKOUT Session 10
TX

Exploring Differential Profiles of Mindfulness Among Gamblers

Jackie Stanmyre; Devin Mills, PhD; Wen Li Anthony, PhD; Lia Nower, PhD, JD

REC

Earned Media: How to Spotlight Your Program and Reach More Help Seekers

Sheila Moran, ICGC-I

SP

Sports Wagering and the Athletes

Jim Brown; Randy Livingston; John Parsons, PhD; Caryl Banks

RG

Regulators Roundtable on Responsible Gambling

Jamie Hummingbird; Dan Hartman; David L. Rebuck, JD

PX

Community Engagement: A Practical Guide to Inform Problem Gambling Prevention

Victor Ortiz; Heang Rubin, PhD; Yoyo Yau

0.5
5:00 PM – 5:30 PM 
General Session
ALL

Reflections on Future of the Field

Keith Whyte

General Session Abstracts

Consider This: 50 Years of Problem Gambling Treatment and Research

Heather Chapman, PhD, ICGC-II, BACC

50 years ago, Dr. Robert Custer and the Cleveland VA Medical Center listened and took a chance. Members of the local Gamblers Anonymous described their concerns. People were struggling. Could there be treatment, as they had for substance use issues? Since this time, the field of gambling treatment has benefited from tremendous efforts from people all over the world. Let’s celebrate these efforts, today. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Learn several historical moments in the field of problem gambling.
  • Learn several scientific advances in the understanding and treatment of gambling.
  • Consider what’s next and their role in year 51 and beyond. 
Say It Loud, I’m Black and I’m Proud!! An Unfinished Lifetime Empowering Healing for People who Gamble and Cultural Communities

Deborah Haskins, PhD, ICGC-II, BACC

Do you remember James Brown’s revolutionary hit song in the 1960’s, “Say It Loud, I’m Black and I’m Proud!!!??” Well, this song was written to empower Black persons/communities in response to a world that stripped away their families, injured them systemically, and failed to see us as human beings. This song while written over 50 years ago continues to be the empowering plea and celebration for Black people, and the pleas are voiced too by many cultural communities. In many ways, gamblers and persons struggling in recovery from co-occurring mental health, health, and life issues are asking to be seen too. They struggle to be validated. Social justice and health equity is often absent in healthcare and disordered gambling and addictions too. From her entry in the profession in the mid-nineties, the concept of health equity and social justice integration did not exist. Despite advancements in advocacy, clinical practice, prevention, and research, we still lag in integrating a health equity, cultural context, and social justice lens (Ortiz, et al., 2021) to support communities. This Lifetime Advocacy Keynote will highlight Dr. Haskins career journey of cultural, social justice, and health equity advocacy and empowerment for gamblers and cultural communities and present a call to action for more community wellness (Haskins, In Press). Her vision is to “move the dial” from the “5% who are treatment seeking” in her unfinished lifetime quest to empower gamblers and cultural communities’ healing at the grassroots level to believe too there is “beauty even in brokenness.”

Learning Objectives:

  • Share career journey in disordered gambling and mental health of cultural, social justice and health equity empowerment
  • Challenge participants with a Call to Action to integrate health equity and social justice and community wellness paradigms to expand healing opportunities, including grassroots efforts
Massachusetts Council on Gaming and Health Alumni Introductions

Marlene Warner

Reflections on Risk

Rachel Volberg, PhD

In this keynote address, Rachel Volberg will reflect on intersections between the risks of gambling and risks that she has taken over a 37-year career studying gambling and gambling harms.  She will reflect on her role in helping to establish the academic field of gambling research, working through research and service to heighten awareness of the impacts of gambling and mentoring younger colleagues.  Contemplating the past and present, her reflections hopefully will help – as Mashama Bailey, chef and owner of The Grey restaurant in Savannah, GA, has said – look back in order to move forward.  Rachel’s reflections will link the values that she has tried to bring to the gambling studies field to the influences of her parents growing up in the Bronx in the 1930’s and to her childhood experiences living in Africa and Europe.  Rachel will touch on three themes: working collaboratively, engaging with communities, and being of service – values that are central to the mission of the National Council on Problem Gambling and to the field of problem gambling.  To Rachel, these values illustrate the concept of Tikkun Olam, the Judaic precept to “repair the world” that she inherited from my parents and have worked to pass on to her daughter. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Recognize important events in the development of the field of gambling studies. 
  • Assess the links between personal experiences and community actions. 
  • Identify central values to the field of problem gambling. 
Reflections on Future of the Field

Keith Whyte 

Join NCPG Executive Director, Keith Whyte, to review highlights of the conference sessions and reflections on the future of the field. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Review highlights of the conference sessions.
  • Reflect on the future of the gambling addiction field. 
  • Reflect on the future of the responsible gambling field.

Treatment Track Session Abstracts

Gambling Disorder and Trauma: Comparing Seeking Safety to CBT

David Ledgerwood, PhD; Lisa Najavits, PhD; Tracie Afifi, PhD

Studies show a compelling association between problem gambling and trauma, including high rates of childhood trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among individuals with gambling disorder (GD). However, there are currently no controlled trials examining interventions for treating GD and PTSD concurrently. Our aims are to: 1) provide an overview of the research literature on GD and trauma/PTSD; and 2) describe the results of a newly completed clinical trial that compares a telehealth-based Seeking Safety (SS), an integrated treatment for PTSD and addiction, to Cognitive-BehavioralF Therapy (CBT-PG), which addresses gambling alone. Sixty-five individuals with co-occurring GD and PTSD were recruited in Manitoba and Ontario, Canada. Primary outcomes were assessed at baseline, 6-weeks, and 1-year, including net gambling losses and number of times gambling (Timeline follow-back), Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale, and PTSD Checklist. Secondary measures of gambling, trauma and functioning were also included. Participants improved across time on almost all measures, including gambling, trauma/ PTSD, other psychiatric symptoms, functioning, and coping. Improvements were similar across treatments. Participants receiving SS demonstrated significantly stronger session attendance. We also found strong therapeutic alliance and treatment satisfaction, and the telehealth format was rated as highly acceptable. These findings show that clinicians and patients have effective options when seeking treatment for concurrent gambling problems and trauma. The implications for further study of GD and PTSD will be discussed. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the current state of research literature on the relationship between gambling disorder, trauma, and post-traumatic stress disorder.  
  • Learn about a newly completed clinical trial that compares two evidence-based gambling disorder treatments, including one that addresses gambling alone, and another that addresses co-occurring gambling and trauma. 
  • Discuss the implications of the current research literature on the treatment of co-occurring gambling disorder and trauma/PTSD. 
Gambling Among Medicated-Assistant Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder: Are We Ignoring Gambling?

Andrew Schreier, ICGC-I

The opioid epidemic has devastated the nation for years and the increase in overdoses during the pandemic continues to make providing resources and help for individuals as a grave necessity. Treatment providers have been working on improving their quality of care to include medicated-assisted treatment, online support groups, training in trauma, use of motivational interviewing, and several other evidence-based practices. Where does gambling fit in among a large population of people seeking treatment for opioid use disorder? Are treatment providers asking questions about gambling as they do with mental health and trauma? This presentation will focus on reviewing survey findings from several medicated-assisted treatment clinics on identifying gambling among the population of patients as well as the substance use professionals and their experience and training on gambling. With many people seeking and needing treatment for opioid use disorder, the question of “are we ignoring gambling” is worth exploring.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore connections between gambling and substance use disorders to increase awareness of dual diagnosis to advocate for the need to include gambling-informed care among MAT professionals and populations.  
  • Review survey findings about gambling in MAT populations and substance use professionals experience and training with gambling.  
  • Assist medicated-assisted treatment providers and substance use professionals in gambling awareness, screening, and resources to assist those who may show signs of problem gambling or gambling use disorder. 
Weaving Together A Blanket of Hope & Help Engaging Organizations to Integrate Problem Gambling Screening into Existing Paradigm

Kristen Beall, ICGC-I

Research supports the importance of screening for problem gambling/disordered gambling, especially as it relates to possible co-occurring disorders. Each March, there is a dedicated national campaign, National Problem Gambling Screening Day, to encourage all organizations to screen for problem gambling. But how do we encourage organizations to embrace the relevance of screening for problem gambling/disordered gambling and maintain that practice as a standard within their treatment paradigms? The Maryland Center of Excellence on Problem Gambling (the Center) is mandated by its funder, the Maryland Department of Health, to outreach and engage behavioral health providers across the state to implement appropriate policies and practices to address problem gambling, and to increase that outreach by 20% each fiscal year. At the end of Fiscal Year 2021, the Center had engaged with over 300 behavioral health providers to integrate problem gambling screening within their organizations. Developing and implementing a solid strategy to “have the conversation” about screening is key. To that end, the Center has developed a screening conversation tool kit that can be presented to and implemented within existing organizational practices. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn outreach “Conversations” and techniques developed by the Center.
  • Understand the questions and even the concerns presented by providers and how the Center responds.
  • Review a copy of the Screening Guide developed by the Center and produced in-house.
Daring Conversations About Identity

Sarah Prager, ICGC-I; John Bundrick, ICGC-II, BACC

The NADAAC and NCPG Codes of Ethics outline several areas in which we are asked to be culturally considerate and responsive, but what does this look like in practice? In this session, participants will learn how to move beyond acknowledging cultural differences and into awareness about micro-aggressions, bias, discrimination, anti-racism and creating psychologically safe spaces. Brené Brown’s Daring Way™ will be used to introduce the concept of Ideal and Unwanted Identities for participants to explore with their clients. This practice allows us to deeply understand an individual’s experience in our society based on their identity and all the parts they welcome and feel “forced” to own. Problem Gambling Professionals will leave this session with new tools and language to facilitate conversations and awareness about identity that will support the unique recovery needs of their clients. 

Learning Objectives:  

  • Investigate the National Association for Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC) Code of Ethics pertaining to diversity, equity, and inclusion. 
  • Gain insight into personal biases and learn ways to do their own work around diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice. 
  • Learn and evaluate Daring Way techniques that lead to a deeper understanding of individual identities. 
Massachusetts Technical Assistance Center (M-TAC): Infusing Innovation to Enhance Problem Gambling Treatment Capacity 

Debi LaPlante, PhD; Victor Ortiz; Heather M. Gray, PhD; Amanda Ayers

This workshop will highlight the Massachusetts Technical Assistance Center (M-TAC) development, approach, and initial implementation strategies. The MA Department of Public Health (DPH) Office of Problem Gambling Services has partnered with Health Resources in Action and the Division on Addiction at Cambridge Health Alliance to develop and implement M-TAC. M-TAC provides DPH-funded clinical and community-based substance use treatment programs with tailored training, technical assistance, and resources to build program capacity to address problem gambling and reduce persistent health disparities. Programs are paired with technical assistance (TA) Coordinators who identify, plan and implement appropriate services. M-TAC’s first year of activities included a statewide needs assessment and the development of individualized TA plans. The second year includes the development of training and collaborative learning opportunities to deliver technical assistance services. This session will describe the innovative work of M-TAC and the comprehensive, evidence-informed approach to increasing statewide capacity around problem gambling treatment services. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the rationale for developing M-TAC.
  • Identify assessment strategies for determining baseline capacity-building needs. 
  • Describe evidence-informed comprehensive capacity-building solutions. 
  • Understand the importance of incorporating DEIJ principles into tailored capacity-building strategies. 
Treating Problem Gamblers & Partners Using A Polyvagal Theory (PVT) & Adaptive Information Processing (AIP) Informed Approach

Suzanne Koch Eckenrode, ICGC-II

In her 20-years of working with gamblers and their loved ones, Suzanne Koch Eckenrode has identified several emerging issues: crises, intense or cut off emotions, great financial insecurity, instability, powerful triggers, broken trust, poor coping, loss of connection to the body, intuition, and others. If clients’ nervous systems and defenses prevail, recovery will be hindered. Polyvagal Theory (PVT) and Adaptive Information Processing (AIP) are neuro-informed, cutting-edge clinical approaches that emphasize that the nervous system is always working towards health and wellness, survival, and adaptation. This presentation will demonstrate how using an integrative, evidence-based approach can help gambler and companion clients better navigate recovery and healing. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify specific examples of the toll of gambling on the nervous system of gamblers and loved ones.  
  • Describe the three states of Polyvagal Theory and their application to treatment. 
  • Describe the integration of PVT and AIP within specific clinical tools and techniques.  
Beyond Loot Boxes: The Convergence of Gaming & Gambling

Jody Bechtold, ICGC-II, BACC; Stephanie Diez-Morel, PhD, ICGC-II, BACC

Today, more people have access to and are participating in, gambling and gaming activities than ever before. While much of the population can participate in these types of activities without developing any issues, there is a small percentage of people who are unable to maintain responsible levels of play. Unfortunately for these individuals, this often progresses to a point where several areas of their lives are impacted in a negative way. The first step to helping is knowing how to identify the areas of convergence between gaming and gambling that go beyond loot boxes. During this clinical workshop, participants will learn about the problems that may be associated with each, how elements of gambling can often be found in gaming, how problems may develop and overlap, and what help is available for someone who is suffering from gambling disorder and gaming addiction.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the convergence of gambling in gaming and how it impacts individuals and families. 
  • Review the biopsychosocial issues and beliefs associated with gaming, problematic gaming, and gaming disorder
  • Identify co-occurring mental health issues to screen at intake and provide measures and assessments to help identify problematic behaviors.
From Gambling 101 to Supervision and Fellowship Programs: Ohio’s Approach to Building Treatment Workforce

Michael Buzzelli; Cory Brown

With increasing forms of gambling available, Ohio has advanced its workforce through collaboration and innovation. This session will review Ohio’s systematic approach to building the infrastructure for gambling support services. Trainings offer over 30 hours of gambling-specific education, the required hours for the Gambling Disorder Endorsement and the International Certified Gambling Counselor certification. The Ohio Gambling Treatment Fellowship Program increases expertise and supervisory roles; aiding state-certified gambling clinicians in their pursuit of international certification through training, supervision, and case consultation. Graduated Fellows can then be used as statewide trainers and content experts. Gambling Helpline operators are trained in problem gambling and suicide prevention on an annual basis to support the nearly 5,000 annual calls to the helpline. To evaluate accessibility and effectiveness, PGNO (Ohio’s NCPG Affiliate) conducts monthly quality assurance calls to the Helpline, as well as quality assurance calls to referred gambling treatment providers. As a result of the Quality Assurance calls, a Warm Transfer process has been created to connect individuals directly to state-certified gambling clinicians 24/7/365. A key component of Ohio’s system is engagement with operators and regulators. Industry collaboration can be seen through each of Ohio’s casino and racino venues providing property tours for workforce professionals during Problem Gambling Awareness Month and industry participation at conferences and other events. Overall, PGNO provides ongoing professional development opportunities to not only keep the workforce interested and educated on problem gambling but also to build an engaged workforce. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss strategies in building a prepared and skilled workforce in the ever-progressing and evolving field of Gambling Disorder.  
  • Discuss the importance of continuous professional development opportunities to encourage expertise and skill-building.
  • Discuss the impact of quality collaboration across the continuum of care and with operation and regulation. 
Providing Evidence-Based and Current Treatment and Training: The Practice of Letting Go and Beginners Mind

Lori Rugle, PhD, ICGC-II, BACC; Wiley Harwell, ICGC-II

A quote from an article titled “Supershrinks” (Miller, Hubble & Duncan, 2007) has been a guidepost for me. To achieve superior performance, “practitioners must be engaged in the process…[of] continuously reaching for objectives just beyond their current ability.” It is human nature to continue doing what is familiar and comfortable. This applies to clinicians, teachers, trainers, and advocates just as much as it applies to those dealing with gambling problems. However, staying satisfied with what is comfortable and familiar does not help us grow, learn, and change. Practicing letting go of our “oldies but goodies” and viewing our work from a beginner’s mind perspective is key to staying grounded in best practices and the most current knowledge in our field. This workshop will focus on how we can challenge ourselves and each other to release what may be idiosyncratic and/or outdated practices and information and to challenge ourselves to work on the edge of our comfort zones to provide the best practices and most current knowledge to those we serve. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Discriminate anecdotal or idiosyncratic practices from evidence-based practices.
  • Learn strategies to practice beginners mind as an approach to incorporating new evidence-based practices into their work. 
  • Participants will be able to utilize strategies to stay current and evidence-based in their work. 
Exploring Differential Profiles of Mindfulness Among Gamblers

Jackie Stanmyre; Devin Mills, PhD; Wen Li Anthony, PhD; Lia Nower, PhD, JD

The present study investigated the five facets of mindfulness and nonattachment in individuals who gamble to identify latent profiles and explore descriptive differences in those profiles relative to etiological precursors to problem gambling. Methods: An online convenience sample of 843 adults (59.91% male; Mage = 39.40 years; SD = 12.52) who gamble completed measures of mindfulness; nonattachment; gambling motivations, cognitions, frequency, and problem severity; and mental well/ill-being. Results: Findings from a series of latent profile analyses supported a four-profile model, representing High, Moderate, and Low Mindfulness as well as a unique profile, Judgmentally Unaware, characterized by low levels of non-judging and acting with awareness. Individuals with the Judgmentally Unaware profile demonstrated more frequent gambling, stronger gambling motivations and gambling-related cognitions, more severe problem gambling, and poorer mental health. Conclusions: This study extends prior findings by clarifying nuances among specific profiles of mindfulness that could bear on levels of problem gambling severity. For groups with high mindfulness and low gambling problem severity, mindfulness interventions could positively inform harm-reduction strategies. However, for a novel “Judgmentally Unaware” group, who are both self-critical and inattentive to their gambling behaviors, more research is needed to identify traits that serve as risk or protective factors in the development and maintenance of problem gambling behavior. Across groups, mindfulness is a promising framework to guide investigations into prevention and intervention with individuals who experience gambling problems. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about recent research on differential mindfulness profiles among people who gamble, as well as differences across profiles of etiological precursors to problem gambling including gambling motivations and cognitions. 
  • Explore ways in which these findings may be translated into practice, particularly mindfulness-based interventions for problem gambling.
  • Examine common traits of those in the most maladaptive profile Judgmentally Unaware that are important for consideration in the development of comprehensive treatment efforts. 

Recovery & Community Track Session Abstracts

Hearing the Voices of Gambling Disorder

Marc Lefkowitz, ICGC-II

This workshop will provide sound bites and commentary from individuals with Gambling Disorders and concerned others. It will provide a unique experience of what Gambling Disorder looks and sounds like as it progresses through the stages of problem gambling. It will also illustrate how, with stakeholder involvement, and a myriad of recovery resources, the messages from these voices will evoke hope, rebuilding, and growth. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Through personal perspective sound bites, stakeholders will achieve a greater understanding of the idiosyncrasies of multiple problem gambling patterns.
  • Understand through the sound bites how the behaviors of persons with Gambling Disorder change over time as the problem progresses. 
  • To learn from concerned others how the behaviors of a person with a Gambling Disorder impact their lives. 
The Work of the UK’s Commission on Crime and Gambling-Related Harms

Sarah Ramanauskas

The Commission on Crime and Gambling-Related Harms, chaired by Lord Peter Goldsmith QC, is a team of over a dozen experts representing the UK’s criminal justice system, public health bodies, lived experience of gambling addiction, and gambling regulation. It was formed in June 2019 to try and answer the following questions: What are the links between gambling addiction and crime? What impact do these links have on communities and society? What should be done? The Commission’s focus is on the impact on communities and society, rather than individuals and treatment, and understanding how people affected by gambling addiction can be diverted from the criminal justice system. An initial review of all the available academic literature showed how little was known, globally, about the links between crime and gambling addiction. As a result, we have commissioned a number of unique research studies, including: – lived experience of addiction and crime, and the criminal justice system – female gamblers and their specific experiences of the criminal justice system – awareness/understanding of gambling addiction amongst the judiciary and in the UK prison system This presentation will summarize the findings from our research to date, which can apply to all gambling jurisdictions, together with the changes we have already been able to push for within the UK legal system and amongst those dealing with gamblers who enter the criminal justice system as a result of addiction. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Why has so little research been carried out into the crimes committed by gambling addicts, and what are the shortcomings of the research that does exist? 
  • What has been the lived experience of gamblers in the UK, who have committed crimes to fund their addiction – what has been the pathway to crime, and how were they supported through the criminal justice system. 
  • Why there are very low levels of knowledge and understanding amongst members of the criminal justice system (CJS), from the police to the probation service, about gambling addiction and how it can lead to crime, and what impact this has on gamblers who encounter the CJS. 
Harm Reduction – Embracing the Change One Case at a Time

Shirley Hoak, JD, ICGC-II

Unprecedented growth and expansion of gambling over the last few years, especially in sports gambling. has brought a new population of people seeking help and looking to reduce the harm caused by their gambling. One thing they are NOT looking for is total abstinence. Abstinence remains a necessary and critical path to recovery for some but not all. Harm Reduction requires treatment, recovery, prevention, and all fields in problem gambling to undergo a shift and develop a curiosity about whether reducing harm is a treatment outcome that providers and peer counselors can support and accept. Abstinence-based treatment and recovery offer structure and certainty. The end goal is clear and unambiguous. Harm reduction requires more ambivalence, acceptance, compassion, and empathy. It is person-centered with the path and endpoint not so clear. Progress may be by leaps and bounds or inch by inch. Harm reduction does not require knowing the endpoint before reaching out for help. How do we assist and guide a person who chooses to take a path of uncertainties and challenges as their road to change and recovery? What does recovery look like when the goal is reducing harm? For Peer Counselors, how do you maintain your own abstinence-based recovery while working with persons choosing Harm Reduction? How do you fit the old paradigm of Abstinence is The Only Way into this new paradigm adopting a “not knowing” attitude and curiosity? Participants are invited to join this discussion.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify two benefits of Harm Reduction approaches in treatment.
  • Name two disadvantages of abstinence-only approaches.
  • Use 2 different self-assessment tools with their clients who may be interested in using the Harm Reduction approach to their gambling 
Inclusion of Gambling Awareness in Student News Program

Kaitlin Brown, ICGC-II, IGDC, BACC; Kelly Leppard

With the largest expansion of gambling opportunities currently happening across the U.S., the gambling field is faced with new challenges as to how to address both the increased marketing and accessibility. Soon, it will be legal to gamble online in many forms from wherever you are located. In CT, we have accepted this challenge and looked to develop innovative ways to get our messages out around problem gambling through new partners. The CT Council on Problem Gambling has collaborated with the Fox 61 Student News Program to include Gambling as a Co-Occurring issue as a category for student selection for the first time. Conversations with youth about addiction have traditionally been about alcohol, tobacco/vaping, and other drugs and rarely include discussions around gambling. Through this program, students can utilize information gained to highlight areas of interest including potential risk factors for developing a problem with gambling, educating the public on the warning signs of a problem developing particularly for youth, policies and responsible gambling efforts in our state to reduce harm to consumers, or interviews with people who have lived experience from gambling-related problems to share stories of recovery. In this workshop, participants will experience examples of the student-created news reports and understand the impact these stories can have on the community at large. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss a new opportunity for education around gambling risks with students. 
  • Identify areas of concern in problem gambling from the youth perspective. 
  • Experience examples of student-created new reports and the impact they can have on the community. 
Learning Lessons? The British Experimentation with the Liberalization of Gambling

Heather Wardle, PhD

Great Britain has one of the most liberal regimes for gambling in the world, where both online gambling (including in-play betting, online casino games/slots/poker) and a variety of land-based forms of gambling are available. In 2007, the Gambling Act 2005 was fully enacted which aimed to promote gambling as a valid leisure activity and allowed gambling to be advertised and marketed fully for the first time. Since then, there has been increasing recognition of the harms associated with gambling and the British government is under pressure to reform the way gambling is promoted and regulated. This paper will draw out key lessons learned during Britain’s liberalization of gambling, focusing on the underlying economic and business practices that drive the industry, the marketing and advertising environment that are a symptom of these models and the impact this has on behavior. By drawing parallels with states and jurisdictions that are just beginning their own process of liberalization, we will seek to learn lessons about what does and doesn’t work for gambling regulation. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Understand the impact of the liberalization of gambling in Britain. 
  • Explore the impact of gambling marketing and advertising on people. 
  • Examine how the gambling industry in Britain makes its profits.
Culture of Caring: A Tribal Values-Driven Responsible Gaming Program

Jennifer Shatley, PhD; Jacob Coin

For nearly 30 years at its flagship Yaamava Resort & Casino (formerly San Manuel Casino) in Highland, California, the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians (SMBMI) has demonstrated through its casino operations the same care and compassion for the people and lands around it as seen throughout the 200 years of the Tribe’s history. SMBMI, like other California gaming tribes, has a demonstrable history of safe and responsible gaming. On Dec. 16, 2021, the Tribe announced the acquisition of Palms Casino & Resort, making history as the first Native American tribe to own and operate a Las Vegas casino. For 25+ years, UNLV International Gaming Institute (IGI) has provided research-based solutions, cutting-edge insights, and executive education to the gaming industry. In 2020, a $9M donation from SMBMI to UNLV was announced as a gift to develop education innovation in the areas of tribal gaming operations and law. To expand the relationship, SMBMI partnered with UNLV’s IGI to develop a first in the world, fully customized and innovative responsible gaming program built on a collaborative process that incorporates the input of Tribal leadership, executive management, team members, and guests to develop a responsible gaming program that will be the first in the world reflecting the Tribes 200-year record of dedication to its concern for others and creating an impact designed to provide for seven generations. Together, the organizations utilize a research-based approach and develop a world-first scalable responsible gaming program built on SMBMI’s cultural values.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Present the fundamentals/goals of designing and building a responsible gaming program on a 200-year-old foundation of cultural beliefs, values, and the mission of a Tribal nation that cares deeply for all people.
  • Reveal findings from the recently completed research and discovery process and share learnings that can impact other organizations looking to design a values-based prevention program 3. Share the process & plan to utilize the findings to develop the program, and the steps involved in the fundamentals/goals of designing and building a responsible gaming program on a 200-year-old foundation of cultural beliefs, values, and the mission of a Tribal nation that cares deeply for all people 2. Reveal findings from the recently completed research and discovery process and share learnings that can impact other organizations looking to design a values-based prevention program. 
  • Share the process & plan to utilize the findings to develop the program, and the steps involved.
Non-Anon: Recovery in the Public Eye

Kitty Martz; Christina Cook

Immediately upon entering gambling recovery, Christina began producing and hosting “The Broke Girl Society”. This break-out, highly popular, woman-focused international podcast quickly became a platform to talk about her own recovery process as it created agency for other women to do the same. Almost a decade ago, Kitty’s early recovery involved interviews with local and national media, participating in a feature film documentary, testifying in front of legislators, and appearing in public service gambling treatment campaigns. This presentation is the story of two different women who have selected visible, public paths of navigating recovery. They discuss how these choices relate to accountability, stigma, relapse, and their own sense of meaning.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Analyze the unique strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to living a public recovery.  
  • Synthesize how a less traditional recovery path can be effective.
  • Obtain resources to augment recovery in modern times including digital media. 
Integrating Telephone Recovery Support into the Voluntary Self Exclusion Process in Massachusetts

Odessa Dwarika; Jodie Nealley

In 2011 the Massachusetts Expanded Gaming Act allowed for the development of casinos while building in protections for people who gamble. These protections included Voluntary Self Exclusion GameSense Information Centers staffed by independent GameSense Advisors (GSA’s). Between 2015 and 2021, the GSA’s conducted over 1000 VSE’s. GameSense Advisors offer referrals to treatment and self-help to those individuals making the decision to self-exclude. In June of 2019, the MACGH introduced Telephone Recovery Support (TRS). TRS is a peer-to-peer support service originally designed for use in drug and alcohol recovery. In the TRS model, a peer in recovery makes weekly calls to check in on the recoveree. Recoverees are offered support, encouragement, and information about resources that may help them seek or maintain their recovery. At the MACGH, an Outreach and Recovery Specialist who is in recovery from gambling addiction herself conducts up to 10 weeks of TRS calls with a gambling focus. Between the inception of the pilot project on July 1, 2020, and today, 35 people have engaged with TRS. MACGH began implementing an evaluation in November of 2021 to measure if TRS is an effective support for those who VSE for problematic gambling.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about TRS as a Recovery Support for Gambling Disorder and how it can be implemented/integrated as part of a VSE program. 
  • Identify the challenges and benefits of offering TRS for problem gambling in the context of VSE. 
  • Discuss the outcomes of 3 TRS participants who engaged in the program.
2021 Statewide Assessment of Gambling and Problem Gambling in Illinois

Hannah Carliner, PhD; Allyson Auerbach; Jim Wilkerson

In 2021, a mixed-methods assessment of gambling and problem gambling, including surveys of residents and frequent gamblers, focus groups, interviews, secondary data analysis, and reviews of best and emerging practices was conducted. This session will discuss how assessment findings can inform comprehensive statewide social determinants of health (SDoH) approach to problem gambling, given the recent expansion in gambling availability. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the differences in the prevalence of problem gambling in different demographic groups, risk factors and correlates of problem gambling, and treatment-seeking behaviors of people with problem gambling.  
  • Consider how to approach problem gambling from social determinants of health perspective and the roles of different stakeholders in developing a comprehensive statewide action plan. 
  • Assess how to make data-informed decisions about public health planning for problem gambling, including initiatives related to prevention, identification and intervention, treatment, and recovery. 
Earned Media: How to Spotlight Your Program and Reach More Help Seekers

Sheila Moran, ICGC-I

Programs that provide problem gambling helpline, prevention, and treatment services must compete with the urgency of other public health issues, notably substance use disorder, to disseminate their message through the media. Many in the public still don’t believe gambling addiction is a “real” issue and hesitancy to seek help for this disorder is well documented. Also, since gambling addiction services vary widely and are usually locally funded and operated, potential help seekers may be unclear about where to find help or what type of treatment is available. Many programs also have less than adequate funds to conduct full-scale paid media campaigns. A solution to this may include a dedicated campaign to generate free stories through earned media. We will talk about how to work with local television and newspaper outlets to generate stories that focus on problem gambling and show the audience that this is a serious disorder while highlighting the services your organization provides. We will give you tips on generating dozens (even hundreds!) of stories that will cost only your time. This strategy can be equally applied to groups focusing on gambling addiction prevention and those who are providing treatment services. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the value of earned media, both in terms of the monetary value and the effect on potential help seekers, those in recovery, and those who have not developed a gambling problem but benefit from the message about responsible gambling and prevention. 
  • Learn strategies for generating free television, radio, and newspaper stories. 
  • Learn the best phrases and language to use to generate stories, encourage those dealing with gambling addiction to seek help, and spread the message of gambling addiction prevention. 

Military Track Session Abstracts

Gambling Problems Among Veterans: Risks, Reach, and Revolution 

Nathan Smith, PhD; David Yeager

In this session, Dr. Smith will summarize the most recent research on gambling harm among US service members including risk and protective factors, prevalence and measurement issues, and a birds-eye view of the research field as it stands today. Dr. Smith will also present information from a new study of responsible gambling on military bases and will conclude by introducing “50x4Vets”, Kindbridge Research Institute’s new program to multiply the research produced on the topic by 50 times in the next 4 years.      

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the risk and protective factors associated with gambling harm for US service members. 
  • Understand the prevalence and measurement issues that impact how gambling disorder and gambling harm are understood in a military context.
  • Understand the implications of the new research presented on responsible gambling on military bases.   
The Impact Military Culture has on Problem Gambling Within the Military and Veteran Communities

Jonathan Crandall; David Yeager

Duty, Selfless Service, Honor, Loyalty, and Respect. These five core values are examples of those used by our service branches and make up a piece of the more influential culture of our military, integral to one’s military service. Military culture is rich with tradition, a tradition that includes gambling. Gambling has been a part of today’s military since the civil war. The culture also primes personal struggle. At times, serving in the military can leave an individual struggling to cope. Modern warriors struggle to cope with trauma, a loss of purpose and identity, or a skewed sense of reality. Understanding military culture from its indoctrination through one’s service will assist us in developing policy and education for the prevention of problem gambling behavior. To effectively treat problem gambling behavior among our military service members and veterans, stigma, a trait entrenched with the rich history of military service, must be addressed. 

 Learning Objectives: 

  • A basic understanding of military culture.
  • How military culture can exacerbate problem gambling.
  • How to utilize key tenets of the warrior ethos to assist a service member or veteran struggling with problem gambling behavior. 
Impact Problem Gambling has on the Military Family & Loved Ones

David Yeager; Shawna Black; Brianne Doura-Schawohl; Rich Taylor; Amanda Winters

As a capstone to the military track of the 2022 NCPG Annual Conference, join us for an educational overview followed by a guided panel that will provide attendees with a broad understanding of the impact problem gambling has on the military family and loved ones. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • A broad understanding of the current problem gambling situation within the military and veteran communities. 
  • Learn how the military family is impacted by a servicemember’s or veteran’s problem gambling behavior and be given resources that are available. 
  • Raise awareness of Operation Responsible Gambling website and the efforts of the Military Committee. 
Veteran Opportunities for Gambling Treatment – How Can I Connect Them?

Tammy Reiff, ICGC-II

How do I reach out to the VA for help?” “I don’t think others REALLY understand me.” “I feel so alone.” These are statements from Military Veterans suffering with problem gambling. Military Veterans suffer from problem gambling up to two times that of the civilian population. Additionally, Veterans with gambling issues have a higher rate of suicide than the civilian population. Do you provide gambling treatment to Military Veterans? Do you have resources for Veterans? Can you help a Veteran get connected to VA services? The VA is a complex health care system that can be overwhelming and intimidating at times. This presentation will help you learn how to identify problem gambling within this special population. You will learn how to assist your Veteran in navigating this complex and often confusing system. Understanding the branches of the VA and “learning the lingo” can be very useful when assisting a Veteran to engage in treatment at the VA. You will learn what gambling services are available within the VA System and how to access them. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to identify Veterans with problem gambling behaviors.
  • Learn how to help a Military Veteran client connect to their local VA System, understanding the difference between the branches of VA Care. 
  • Learn what gambling-related services are available for eligible Veterans. 
Creating National Awareness for Military Personnel & Veterans with Gambling Problems: Challenges & Opportunities

Rich Taylor; Kevin Wensing

 Statistics about gambling addiction among military personnel and veterans are stark yet there is still not enough national attention to ensure that those who serve/served receive the resources they deserve to prevent and treat gambling addiction. NCPG Military Committee Chair Rich Taylor will interview retired US Navy Captain Kevin Wensing about his experience working with the Gary Sinise Foundation and USO to address Veterans’ health issues and the opportunities and challenges to raise the profile of problem gambling. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn statistics about gambling addiction among military personnel and Veterans. 
  • Discuss the current state of resources for those who serve or have served to prevent and treat gambling addiction.  
  • Learn about successful strategies to increase awareness of Veterans’ health issues and the opportunities and challenges to raise the profile of problem gambling.

Responsible Gambling Track Session Abstracts

Legislating For the Future: NCLGS Responsible Gambling Resolution

Hon. Christie Carpino; Marlene Warner

The National Coalition of Legislators from Gaming States (NCLGS) is developing a resolution to help states develop their own robust responsible gambling guidelines. The resolution developed by the NCLGS Responsible Gambling Committee is designed to offer enough guidance for policymakers for legislation and regulation with enough space so that as technology and the field evolve this is still an appropriate and useful document. Attendees are invited to contribute their feedback. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Review the responsible gambling resolution from the National Coalition of Legislators from Gaming States.
  • Discuss how the resolution will help states develop their own robust responsible gambling guidelines.  
  • Offer guidance to policymakers for responsible gambling legislation and regulation.
Beyond Just “What Good Looks Like”: A U.S. Operators’ Response

Julie Hynes, IGDC; Chrissy Thurmond

What does good look like is a buzz question that the authors are frequently posed about responsible gaming programming in a nascent and burgeoning U.S. online gaming industry. In the responsible gaming space, what good looks like has tended to be viewed from the lens of following overseas operators, who often have seasoned and well-funded programs, bolstered with increasingly strict regulatory requirements. U.S. operators, however, are adjusting to new markets and jurisdictional distinctions that are unique to the U.S. landscape. The DraftKings responsible gaming program is a rapidly growing initiative, taking an evidence-based approach in building a comprehensive foundation consisting of five core pillars; the aim of this strategy is to go far above and beyond checking the box. Successful programming must consider riding the delicate balance of ensuring thorough safeguards while in cultural alignment with Americans’ desire for individual choice. In this workshop, we will discuss current opportunities and challenges in U.S. responsible gaming among online commercial operators, foundations of a systems-based program in this space, up-to-date examples and metrics of evidence-based programming in practice, and potential for cross-sector partnerships across various stakeholder groups. After all, the goal for all of us ought to be not just good, but to get to what excellence looks likes?  

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify at least three current and unique jurisdictional factors that distinguish United States responsible gaming programs from overseas operators. Describe a systems-based approach to online commercial gaming responsible gaming programming. 
  • Identify at least three evidence-based strategies currently being implemented among some U.S. operators.
  • Name at least two specific opportunities for partnership between industry and other sectors. 
Responsible Gambling Implications & Applications for Lotteries

Marlene Warner

Lotteries are still by far the form of gambling with the highest participation, making them a key stakeholder in responsible gambling. The New England region includes the oldest lottery as well as the lottery with the highest per capita sales. These very different lotteries face an array of challenges in social responsibility as they add online gambling and sports betting to traditional games but have developed innovative responses on a number of responsible gambling issues.    

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the unique characteristics of New England lotteries.
  • Discuss social responsibility challenges presented by online gambling, sports betting and other developments.
  • Learn about the innovative responsible gambling programs these lotteries have put into place.
Best RG Practices for Tribal Operators in Internet-Based Gaming

Raquel Buari, JD

As one of the few tribes who have entered the legalized internet gaming space, still in its early years – I believe it is crucial to talk about how we must handle responsible gaming efforts differently in this space than we do in our brick-and-mortar operations. Many of the RG efforts for internet gaming will be directed by regulatory requirements, but it is how you implement those requirements and when and how to go above and beyond those requirements that we need to address. There are many variables that make the internet gaming space more susceptible to gambling addiction while at the same time being seemingly more difficult to recognize gambling addictions in the faceless patrons that the online platforms serve. To add to that, there can be nuances in the fact that tribal operators are licensed by and regulated by many for the first time – State Regulators, who may have the same or differing regulations related to responsible gaming than the tribe’s gaming commission. Also, how do you (or do you not), coordinate your brick-and-mortar self-exclusions with your online self-exclusions? There are many questions and many of us are still working our way through the answers, but as this industry grows, we must proactively talk about our best practices to ensure that tribal operators remain at the forefront of responsible gaming practices.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the landscape of tribal internet gaming and regulation and specifically regarding responsible gaming. Who regulates and what are some of the common regulatory requirements?  
  • How to implement the regulatory requirements and put in place measures to “flag” behaviors that may indicate problem gambling, and in some situations are you at the mercy of your platform provider to ensure compliance with your internal controls.
  • How to successfully implement a self-exclusion process for your internet gaming operation and should you, or should you not – coordinate that with your brick-and-mortar process.
Innovative Solutions That Make Player Protection and Safer Gaming Attainable Today

Nick Hill; Paul Foster

In the UK, even as one of the most regulated jurisdictions, the number of self-excluded players has been on a sharp rise, especially after the multiple lockdowns. Other countries in Europe are also reporting more people facing gambling-related harms than ever. At the same time, litigations against online casinos and sports betting operators are on the rise. Most operators are getting fines due to the following reasons: – failing to identify and proactively interact with players at risk of gambling-related harms (Responsible Gambling) – failing to follow KYC procedures or to properly store historic KYC data (AML) To prevent further problem gambling, both regulators and operators are focusing on innovative solutions such as blockchain technology and player behavior monitoring systems to proactively prevent players from developing gambling issues as well as correctly detect players’ affordability to maintain a safe and sustainable gambling environment. Many are also focusing their efforts to adapt bulletproof KYC solutions to ensure that casino and sports betting websites are not accessible for minors. As a representative of a collaborative effort happening in Europe, we would love to be given an opportunity to shed light on the current adoption to use blockchain technology as a utility application in conjunction with solutions such as player protection tools and showcase the usage cases that can protect players also here in the U.S. We believe that the topic will inspire some meaningful and pragmatic discussions on how to realize Responsible Gambling in a sensible and achievable manner. 

Learning Objectives:  

  • Introduction to prevention tools using Markers of Harm (MoH): Using indicators such as MoH can allow casino and sports betting operators to automatically monitor the player’s behavior compared to his or her own behavior on other days to accurately monitor the diverse player base of different risk levels. Appropriate interactions or communications to the players based on triggered MoH can significantly protect the players who are starting to show the risk of gambling harm. Some of the European regulators are standardizing the use of MoH to prevent addictions or other gambling-related problems. 
  • Evaluating the various requirements of regulated markets in Europe to find out how effective they are to prevent problem gambling and what the U.S. market potentially can focus on self-exclusion, deposit limits, session limits, spin duration, etc. 
Collaboration and Partnership: Expanding the Lens of Responsible Gambling

Victor Ortiz; Lorena Lama; Christian Teja 

The MA Department of Public Health (DPH) Office of Problem Gambling Services (OPGS) has the goal of ensuring a comprehensive and integrated public health response to problem gambling using data to inform initiatives, engage communities, and ensure cultural intelligence and humility. Since 2016, OPGS has led a public health response to mitigate harm associated with gambling. An important element of these efforts is working in partnership and collaboration with multiple sectors. To that extent, OPGS has established a formal collaboration with the Mass. State Lottery Commission to expand the lens of Responsible Gambling to include public health strategies and principles to ensure reach and effectiveness. In this workshop, we will provide a conceptional framework, goals, and initial outcomes of collaborative efforts including the annual holiday campaign, training for lottery staff, and promotion of state helpline services. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify key strategies for establishing collaboration and partnerships with the lottery industry sector. 
  • Identify key challenges and barriers. 
  • Identify resources. 
Asian Outreach: Inside the Casino & Outside in the Community

Linh Ho; Vivian Xu

The MA Council on Gaming Health operates the GameSense program in Massachusetts. While most efforts are geared towards promoting healthy gambling behavior to patrons and staff inside the casinos, a small subset of the GameSense team also makes similar efforts out in the community. Linh Ho, fluent in Vietnamese, and Vivian Xu, fluent in Mandarin and Cantonese, lead the GameSense team’s outreach efforts to the Asian Community. They provide presentations to community organizations, attend events that are designed to appeal to the Asian community, table and provide information at Asian retail centers, and even occasionally ride the bus back and forth between Chinatown and Encore Boston Harbor Casino. In doing so, they are meeting people where they are at, gaining credibility, and building trust. Further, they lead efforts to develop and implement educational activities around Asian holidays and special events such as Lunar New Year, the Dragonboat Festival, and the Mooncake Festival. Through these efforts, they have built extensive relationships with the Asian community. This has led to an enhanced understanding of healthy gambling behavior, as well as more voluntary self-exclusion. Linh and Vivian look forward to sharing their experiences with you! 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about why Asian outreach around problem gambling and responsible gambling is important; how GameSense develops relationships with key staff inside of the casinos and community leaders outside of the casinos; and how they deliver RG and PG content in a way that is relevant, interesting, and understandable.
A Baseline Survey of Jackpot Winners at Three MGM Properties: A Study of Sustainability & Risk

Sasha Stark, PhD

Our understanding of jackpot winners is limited. Most research focuses on the impact of early big wins, and the results are mixed. While some research finds that experiencing an early big win can lead to a gambling problem, other work finds that players are more likely to stop playing after an early versus later big win. In addition, little research focuses on the impacts of winning a jackpot beyond developing a gambling problem or the types of responsible gambling messages that are best suited to this group. No studies to date, to our knowledge, attempt to understand how best to utilize this important touchpoint with customers to promote responsible gambling. This project focuses on identifying how jackpot winners are impacted by winning and by responsible gambling messaging. A key piece of this work involves developing and testing approaches to support players to use their wins in a sustainable way by maximizing the benefits and reducing the risks. We also seek to identify the positive and negative impacts of winning over time. This presentation will review results from a literature review on winners-focused research and a baseline survey completed by jackpot winners at 3 MGM properties. It will consider winners’ demographics, jackpot details, and gambling beliefs and behaviors. 

 Learning Objectives 

  • Identify the gaps in existing research on winners. 
  • Appreciate the need and opportunity for responsible gambling messages with this audience. 
  • Understand who winners are, what their specific jackpot experiences are, and what their wider gambling behaviors and beliefs look like.
Responsible Gaming Features in a Growing Digital Environment

Jade Luchauer; Jesse Saccoccio

The legalization of casinos and lotteries in the United States has boomed over the past 30 years. Now, with sports betting legalized in 30 states and many more poised to follow suit, a new wave of expansion is here. Given this changing landscape, are you prepared to make the leap? Where do you focus your efforts? What’s the evidence telling us? It’s safe to say there’s no clear path forward, but there’s also no need to panic. Presenters in this session will make the case that slim but convincing evidence necessitates a continued focus on public health strategies to minimize harm. However, these strategies need to be adaptable, span physical and digital space and require the cooperation of industry, regulators, and public health stakeholders. Specific responsible gaming strategies and research underpinnings will be shared.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the evolving landscape of gambling opportunities in the United States as it pertains to sports wagering.
  • Connect evidence to a range of strategies.
  • Understand that a range of strategies is necessary for an effective public health response. 
Regulators Roundtable on Responsible Gambling

Jamie Hummingbird; Dan Hartman; David L. Rebuck, JD

Learn from leading casino regulators how they are addressing the surge in sports betting advertising and how they balance revenue and responsibility. They will discuss the role of the regulation in responsible gambling as well as the opportunities and obligations regulators have regarding the data operators collect on players and how it may be used for responsible gambling. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn from leading casino regulators how they are addressing the surge in sports betting advertising and how they balance revenue and responsibility.
  • Discuss the role of the regulation in responsible gambling.
  • Learn about the opportunities and obligations regulators have regarding the data operators collect on players, and how it may be used for responsible gambling.

Prevention Track Session Abstracts

CampusCents

James Syphax

CampusCENTS is an online, self-directed course developed by Prevention Action Alliance (formerly Drug-Free Action Alliance), funded by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) with development overseen by Ohio’s collaborative, Ohio for Responsible Gambling made up of the Ohio Lottery, the Casino Control Commission, and the Ohio Racing Commission. The objective of the project is to promote responsible gambling by offering financial information, resources, support, and guidance to 18 25-year-olds. The 120-minute course, designed for use on college campuses, provides opportunities for interactive content and quizzes, decision-making activities, and real-life scenarios. It is divided into five modules about personal financial wellness and is designed to help students: Become intrigued with concepts around money and financial affairs that can lead to behavior change; Gain practical experience with personal finance concepts and tools that can be applied in real-time experiences; Increase awareness of the personal responsibility aspect of personal finance; Develop confidence in dealing with personal finances; Determine how (and if) gambling fits into a personal budget; and Learn low-risk guidelines for gambling.

Learning Objectives:

  • Share prevention resources with others focusing on the 18 – 25-year-old population.
  • Promote the prevention of problem gambling through financial literacy and education.  
  • Collaborate with others on the collection of data and review to establish CampusCENTS as a promising practice.
Adolescent Problem Gambling Prevention Curriculum in a Learning Management System

Alison Drain

The North Carolina Problem Gambling Program has been delivering Stacked Deck, a problem gambling prevention curriculum, to over 40 middle schools and high schools across North Carolina each year for over ten years. The prevention coordinator offers a grant and a “train the trainer” session for teachers and counselors to implement the curriculum in classes. In 2018, the prevention coordinator began working with the Stacked Deck research team to update the guidebook and provide feedback from teachers and counselors on the curriculum. In 2019, the updated curriculum was released to North Carolina to pilot. However, 2019 also brought the pandemic and school closings. The prevention coordinator worked with a team to record all of the current Stacked Deck lessons and release them in a program called SoftChalk. Nine schools participated in the online program. There were 340 successful logins to the curriculum and 240 of those logins successfully completed the entire Stacked Deck online program. Some of these logins constituted entire classes viewing the curriculum together either virtually or in the classroom. In 2020, the prevention coordinator worked with a team to record the updated Stacked Deck curriculum and added in two bonus lessons. In 2021, the updated Stacked Deck curriculum and two bonus lessons were loaded into a learning management system for over 500 students to access. The official program evaluation occurred with the assistance of the University of North Carolina Greensboro and Dr. Stephanie Diez-Morel with Reboot to Recover. Results of the evaluation are upcoming. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the steps and partnerships it takes to record and launch a prevention curriculum in a learning management system. 
  • Identify the impact a learning management system can have on the evaluation of problem gambling prevention curriculum.
  • Describe the importance of working with researchers to develop evaluation tools for problem gambling prevention curriculum. 
Engaging Prevention Professionals in a Treatment-Focused Fellowship Program

Cory Brown

Ohio has been at the forefront of gambling treatment workforce development innovation since 2016 when the Ohio Disordered Gambling Treatment Supervision Fellowship Program was created. The program’s original function was to build capacity around gambling treatment supervision in the state, but with so few gambling counselors, the focus shifted to improving existing gambling treatment services, providing professional development for former and current Fellows, and strengthening Ohio’s gambling treatment workforce. From 2016 to 2020, the Fellowship Program graduated 28 treatment professionals from across Ohio by presenting a case presentation. In October 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic, PGNO discussed accepting a prevention professional into the 6th cohort of the Fellowship program. Discussions were held about proper fit and relevance to treatment, especially as the Fellowship program switched focus from gambling treatment competencies to project development. PGNO staff ultimately decided that the project-based approach was well-suited for prevention professionals who worked closely with gambling treatment professionals and the first gambling prevention professional was accepted into the program. The Fellowship program has since graduated 1 prevention professional and accepted another for the 7th cohort. This showcase will highlight the benefits to both prevention and treatment professionals, clients, and the gambling service system at large. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the importance of problem gambling prevention in treatment-focused community health agencies.
  • Learn how problem gambling prevention professionals can improve problem identification, referral to treatment, and modalities at community health agencies.
  • Learn how to work with problem gambling treatment providers to improve the overall scope of services at community health agencies. 
No Need to Master Every Topic, But Master Collaboration!

Michael Buzzelli

As gambling and gaming continue to merge, we find ourselves with a growing need to collaborate with professionals who have expertise in special content areas and in niche fields. We certainly must hold ourselves accountable to becoming familiar with emerging trends, policies, and programs but simply cannot be expected to master every aspect of gambling, Gambling Disorder, and all its expanding components. Collaboration is defined as “working with someone to produce or create something.” But is it really that simple? In this short presentation, the facilitator will use an example of NCPG Ohio and PA affiliates collaborating with a university, its faculty, and Esports researchers to deliver a robust and impactful program on gambling, gaming, and how to support a peer who may be struggling. To ethically and effectively provide accurate information in an ever-expanding field we must master the art of collaboration!  

Learning Objectives:

  • Share strategies on increasing cross-sector and cross-affiliate collaboration.
  • Discuss the importance of collaborating with workforce professionals who hold certain specializations and expertise.
  • Highlight an example of a recent successful collaboration between NCPG Affiliates, Universities, and Esports Researchers to provide an addiction and mental health program to an academic Esports minor program. 
A D.I.Y. (Do It Yourself) Approach to Underage and Problem Gambling Awareness: Engaging Community Organizations through the Use of Toolkit Guides

Heather Eshleman

The Maryland Center of Excellence on Problem Gambling (the Center) promotes monthly public health awareness campaigns through the Center’s websites, e-blasts, social media, and the creation of engaging print and electronic posters. The Center maximizes outreach of underage and problem gambling awareness messaging for these monthly campaigns by engaging with organizations to create and promote their own awareness messaging within their communities. For a minimum cost, the Center develops detailed awareness toolkit guides which provide ready-made strategies and messages for a broad range of uses, and widely distributes these toolkits to organizations through e-distribution channels. These toolkits encourage organizations to put their own spin on awareness and thus engages the whole organization to promote underage and problem gambling awareness for not just a specific monthly campaign, but on an ongoing basis. In this workshop, participants will learn about monthly public health campaigns that can be linked to underage and problem gambling awareness (such as December Gift Responsibly Campaign, March Problem Gambling Awareness Month, and May Mental Health Awareness Month); what awareness strategies organizations are most likely to use, emphasizing wellness and positive messaging in promoting underage and problem gambling prevention; and review of the Center’s Toolkit Guides for creating your own template.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand what monthly public health awareness campaigns can be connected to underage and problem gambling prevention and examples of these linkages. 
  • Learn about awareness strategies and messaging that can be included in a toolkit guide and review the importance of framing awareness messaging in a positive way by using a wellness perspective.  
  • Review Toolkit Guides developed by the Center for December, March, and May awareness campaigns and discuss tips on how to develop guides for engagement within your state. 
Gambling and Comorbidities

Mina Hazar; Adela Colhon

Co-Morbidity in disordered gambling is common and individuals who seek mental health or substance-use treatment often have a co-occurring gambling problem. Outcomes may be improved when separate treatment modalities for these disorders are offered in combination. It is increasingly important for prevention and education specialists to increase awareness about the matter so treatment providers and mental health practitioners screen individuals presenting with gambling problems for mental illnesses and substance use disorders and individuals with mental illness and substance use disorders screened for a range of nonsubstance problematic behaviors, including problem gambling, internet overuse and excessive videogame playing. This presentation increases the awareness of the link between problem gambling and other related conditions (e.g., mental illness, substance use disorder) among service providers working with vulnerable populations.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Increased awareness of the link between problem gambling and other related conditions. 
  • Increased integrated services for problem gambling treatment as opposed to separate treatment modalities.
  • Treatment providers and mental health practitioners screening individuals presenting with gambling problems for mental illnesses and substance use disorders and individuals with mental illness and substance use disorders screened for a range of nonsubstance problematic behaviors, including problem gambling, internet overuse, and excessive video game playing.
Prevention of Digital Addictions for Children Living with ADHD: A Care Giver’s Experience Unfolded

Alison Drain; Stephanie Diez-Morel, PhD, ICGC-II, BACC

Problematic Interactive Media Use or PIMU includes problematic use of gaming, social media, pornography, and information seeking on the internet (Young, 2017). A co-occurring disorder that presents with PIMU is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in addition to anxiety disorders, oppositional defiant disorder, substance use disorder, and depression (Young, 2017). Research also indicates that children with Gaming Disorder (GD) consistently show symptoms associated with a diagnosis of ADHD (Evren, 2018). Additionally, those living with ADHD and who experienced problem gambling have greater difficulties with emotional dysregulation and a higher severity with their symptoms of gambling disorder (Mestre-Bach, 2019). The convergence of gaming and gambling as well as the increased legalization of online sports betting in tandem with the pandemic has created a perfect storm for an uptick in those living with ADHD experiencing an addiction to the internet in its many forms. Dr. Stephanie Diez-Morel, Professor, Researcher, and Founder of Reboot and Recover, and Alison Drain, MSW, MPA, and Youth Prevention and Treatment Specialist for LifeWorks with the North Carolina Problem Gambling Program, will provide information on the research and intervention strategies that prevention specialists and parents can implement. The presentation will include an understanding of how impulsivity and emotional dysregulation affect those living with ADHD and how these symptoms of ADHD are also risk factors for developing a behavioral addiction in the form of PIMU, Gaming Disorder, or Gambling Disorder. The position and experiences of the caretaker will be a focal point of the presentation.  

Learning Objectives: 

  • Discuss some of the research that has been conducted on the effects that gaming, gambling, and digital platforms have on those living with ADHD.
  • Identify ADHD as a risk factor for PIMU, gaming disorder, and gambling disorder. 
  • Describe how caretakers must be engaged to reduce the risk factors associated with PIMU, gaming disorder, and gambling disorder utilizing prevention methods designed for those living with ADHD. 
The Blurred Lines of Gambling and Day Trading

Daniel Trolaro

Gambling traditionally involves three elements: prize, chance, and consideration. And while certain activities can be debated as to whether or not they constitute gambling, it is always important to address the mechanics, behaviors, and potential for harm. One such activity that has seen explosive growth is in the world of day trading. This workshop will provide a basic walkthrough into the world of investments and types of trading, explore the connection between day trading and gambling, and identify the warning signs and potential for harm.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the similarities and differences between gambling, speculation, and investment.
  • Learn about the shortening reward schedule among various types of activities.
  • Identify the various types of trading strategies and behaviors associated with each one.
Working in Diverse Communities

Maria Garner, ICGC-II; George Hicks

Gambling issues are expressed differently in each culture. The breakout session will take a team approach in addressing the need to build alliances in different communities in order to gain a better understanding of each to serve them more effectively. We will examine the concept of Culture humility, building on existing programs, and avoiding cultural arrogance, and finally, we will share the process and results from a joint effort between the Asian American Community Services (AACS), Maryhaven Gambling Intervention Program, Representative from Ohio in Arabic, and a representative from Mercardo inc. Demonstrate examples in each community. Panel format with Questions and Answer section included. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Demonstrate that cultural humility is the key to serving diverse populations.
  • How to overcome barriers to cross-cultural work – NAMWM .
  • Report out of the diverse work examples: African American, Latinx, Asian American, and Middle Eastern Asian Communities. 
Impacts of COVID-19 on Problem Gambling Services: Findings from the 2021 NAADGS National Survey

Jeff Marotta, PhD, ICGC-II; Linda Graves, ICGC-II

Every three to five years the National Association of Administrators for Disordered Gambling Services (NAADGS) gathers information about problem gambling services in the United States. This surveillance effort takes the form of a state-by-state review of reports, government documents, and most importantly enlisting the help of key informants to provide detailed information. This presentation will describe what was discovered about problem gambling services in the U.S. in 2021, how the COVID-19 pandemic affected problem gambling services, with findings compared to previous survey years. 

Learning Objectives:  

  • Understand how problem gambling services differ from state to state. 
  • Describe how COVID-19 impacted state-funded problem gambling services by understanding differences and similarities across states. 
  • Understand how state-funded problem gambling services in the U.S. has changed over the past 10 years. 
Conducting an Underage and Problem Gambling Prevention Needs Assessment

Heather Eshleman

Starting in 2019, the Maryland Center of Excellence on Problem Gambling Prevention Office developed a plan to conduct a prevention needs assessment. On the quantitative side, all sources of data on gambling in the State of Maryland were listed with the goal of pulling the main findings from each source so one document could be created for ease of use for prevention professionals and the public. Charts and graphs were created to display the data to make it easier to understand and paint the picture of underage and problem gambling in Maryland. In addition, focus groups and key interviews of target populations were conducted to assess the “why” of the public health problem of underage and problem gambling. Focus groups and key interviews collected data on the contributing factors of community norms, retail access, social access, enforcement, perceived risk, and individual factors of underage and problem gambling behaviors. This workshop will provide an overview of the process and tools needed to conduct an underage and problem gambling prevention needs assessment in a local jurisdiction or state. Preliminary results of the Maryland need assessment will be presented as well as successes and challenges of conducting an underage and problem gambling prevention needs assessment. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn to identify sources of gambling data in their state to compile a quantitative needs assessment. 
  • Understand data collection on key community contributing factors to underage and problem gambling by conducting focus groups and key interviews.
  • Identify the successes and challenges of conducting an underage and problem gambling prevention needs assessment in Maryland during COVID-19 and beyond. 
Unpacking the Root Causes of Problem Gambling in the Asian Community

Heang Rubin, PhD; Yoyo Yau; Mia Colby; Ben Hires

There are many root causes of problem gambling in the Asian community, including poverty, social, and cultural loss due to immigration, and unhealthy stress relief. Gambling harm can have short and long-term impacts on children, families, and the community. The current study sought to understand how problem gambling manifests in the Asian community and to understand whether existing programs, services, and interventions are adequately serving this immigrant community. Bilingual/bicultural community fieldworkers conducted 40 in-depth qualitative interviews to better understand the nature and impact of problem gambling. Participants were community members from the Cambodian, Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese communities. Researchers also reviewed the state of the science relevant to gambling problems in Asian communities and looked nationally at a few existing programs. The authors identified existing resources within a coalition of organizations assisting Asian immigrants/refugees and Asian American families in Boston’s Chinatown and surrounding communities that can be leveraged to engage hard-to-reach and at-risk populations. This report provides an in-depth look at gambling’s negative impacts on family and community as it pertains specifically to the Asian community. This report also looks at the role of the casinos in exacerbating gambling in the Asian community and whether this community is being adequately served. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the root causes and unhealthy, pre-existing systemic conditions that can lead to this espoused form of entertainment turning into an addiction that hurts individuals, families, and the broader community. 
  • Explore the innovative and actionable key recommendations that inform decision-makers to act on these findings.
  • Gain knowledge on the importance of community research which is led by community organizations. 
Agility Grants: Innovation and Amplification in Gambling Prevention

Elizabeth Thielen; Wiley D. Harwell, D. Min., ICGC-II

A strategic NCPG initiative funded by the National Football League Foundation, Agility Grants offer funding to nonprofit organizations across the country for problem gambling prevention programs. The goal of these grants is to fill in gaps for areas that currently have no such services, as well as bolster promising efforts in existing programs. Funding will support prevention programming innovation and amplification. Learn more about the Round 1 grantees and their programs. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Learn about the Agility Grant program criteria and application process.
  • Discuss the scope and goal of the program to fill in gaps for areas that currently have no such services.
  • Meet the Round one grantees and learn about their problem gambling prevention programs. 
Key Lessons from Responsible Drinking Programming and Partnerships

Adam Warrington

In a first-of-its-kind coalition, Anheuser-Busch partnered with Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) and Uber to take anti-drunk driving and proactive decision making to a new level with the goal of ultimately saving thousands of lives. The groundbreaking partnership came to life through an ongoing campaign platform of “Decide to Ride” – engaging consumers in multiple channels to raise awareness and provide enhanced ridesharing opportunities to prevent drunk driving. The objective of the coalition was clear: create an ongoing effort to influence consumer behavior and ultimately help end drunk driving.  

Never before has a partnership of this magnitude existed; a leading brewer, a tech ridesharing company, and the nation’s largest drunk driving victim services and advocacy nonprofit joining forces to help stop drunk driving. The coalition’s multi-year approach has media focus in Atlanta, Denver, Phoenix, D.C., St. Louis, Dallas, Houston, and Cincinnati markets that specifically reach the target audience and an age demographic with the highest rate of drunk driving.  

  Learning Objectives: 

  • Explore how unlikely alliances can be formed to address key societal issues. 
  • How to maximize media partnerships to deliver messaging that drives social impact. 
  • Using unique approaches of social norms to drive awareness and behavioral changes among customers in the 21-35 demographic.   
Community Engagement: A Practical Guide to Inform Problem Gambling Prevention

Victor Ortiz; Heang Rubin, PhD; Yoyo Yau

Problem gambling is governed by a complex set of interrelating factors, causes, and determinants ranging from biology and family history to social norms and existing statutes (Messerlian, Derevensky, Gupta, 2005). Research indicates that gambling is interrelated with various health issues and disproportionately impacts individuals with mental health disorders, substance misuse disorders (Kessler, Hwang, Petukhova, Sampson, Winters, & Shaffer, 2008), and communities of color (Alegría, Petry, Hasin, Liu, Grant, & Blanco, 2009). Historically, community-level experiences of gambling and communities of color are often not the focus of problem gambling services and efforts. Preliminary research indicates that ethnic and racial minorities have higher rates of gambling problems than the adult general population (Barry, Stefanovics, Desai, Potenza, 2011). Since 2016, the Office of Problem Gambling Services (OPGS) has implemented a social-ecological method to carry out a public health response to problem gambling. OPGS has engaged over 1,400 community members along with over 40 community-based organizational partners to inform the development of priorities and ensure that cultural and community perspectives are embedded in our work. Community input has informed 23 initiatives across the continuum of care: prevention, intervention, treatment, and recovery support. In this workshop, we will provide highlights, opportunities, lessons learned for community engagement strategies to inform problem gambling services. This workshop will feature the results Community-Level Health Project-Everett: a comprehensive community engagement and empowerment effort to promote health and well-being. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify key strategies for the implementation of community engagement to inform programs and services.
  • Identify strategies in building and promoting health equity.  
  • Identify resources to carry out a public health response to problem gambling.

Sports Track Session Abstracts

Educating Young Sports Bettors: The FanDuel Approach

Adam Warrington; Craig Carton

In late 2021, FanDuel announced a unique partnership with sports radio host Craig Carton, with Carton becoming the company’s first responsible gaming ambassador. Carton’s role with FanDuel is focused on three critical areas: advocacy, prevention awareness and content development focused on the importance of wagering within limits. Carton’s story and history with gambling has been well documented and was the focus of the HBO documentary WILD CARD. Carton is dedicated to using his experience and platform to shine a meaningful spotlight on the issue of problem gambling. The focus of the joint work of Carton and FanDuel is young male sports fans, who Carton has long connected with through his radio show. In addition, Carton spends considerable time with FanDuel’s employees helping to drive a deeper culture of responsibility within the organization. In the session, Carton and FanDuel’s vice president of responsible gaming will discuss a series of topics, including:

  • Carton and FanDuel’s content creation strategies and approaches tied to responsible gaming.
  • How a known problem gambler and operator can work together while avoiding conflicts of interest.
  • Carton’s personal story and his main pieces of advice for the entire gambling industry.

Learning Objectives: 

  • How a gaming operator and those impacted by problem gambling can work together to drive education and awareness of RG resources.
  • How to maximize media partnerships to deliver messaging that drives social impact. 
  • Unique approaches to drive increased use of operator RG tools with customers. 
Perspectives on the Impact of Sports Betting on Mind, Body and Brain

Tim Fong, MD

As sports betting expands rapidly throughout the United States, there are essential questions about how this impacts psychological, physical and social health.    This workshop will explore and discuss how gambling advertising impacts gambling behavior, what impact sports betting may have on mental and physical well-being and the implications of a society embedded with instant and constant access to sports betting.    Of particular interest is exploring how sports betting impacts individual mental and physical health as compared to other forms of gambling such as electronic gaming machines, table games or the lottery 

Learning Objectives:

  • List three ways that sports betting can impact individual physical or mental health.
  • Identify three ways that increased access to sports betting will impact public health.
  • Develop a prevention roadmap for minimizing increases in the prevalence of sports bettors with gambling disorders.
College Student Athletes’ Gambling Behaviors: A Look at Changes in Sports Wagering from 2004-2020

Jeffrey L. Derevensky, PhD

The National Collegiate Athletic Association has been collecting information on college student-athletes every four years, beginning in 2004. The landscape of gambling has vastly changed during the past two decades. More land-based gambling venues (casinos, VLTs) are present, a greater number of states permit a variety of forms of online gambling, and most recently there has been a surge in sports wagering across the U.S. With the growing number of states permitting and regulating sports wagering there has been a general concern about youth problem gambling. In particular, a number of researchers have raised concerns about athletes’ sports wagering. This presentation will examine gambling behaviors and trends among college student-athletes. The most recent data from the 2020 cohort will be discussed along with specific recommendations for prevention and treatment. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine trends in college student gambling behaviors over the past 16 years.
  • Identify changes in sports wagering among college student-athletes.
  • Identify prevention and harm minimization strategies for college student-athletes. 
A Strategic Framework for Sports Wagering

Mark Vander Linden; Marie-Claire Flores Pajot

The legalization of casinos and lotteries in the United States has boomed over the past 30 years. Now, with sports betting legalized in 30 states and many more poised to follow suit, a new wave of expansion is here. Given this changing landscape, are you prepared to make the leap? Where do you focus your efforts? What’s the evidence telling us? It’s safe to say there’s no clear path forward, but there’s also no need to panic. Presenters in this session will make the case that slim but convincing evidence necessitates a continued focus on public health strategies to minimize harm. However, these strategies need to be adaptable, span physical and digital space and require the cooperation of industry, regulators, and public health stakeholders. Specific responsible gaming strategies and research underpinnings will be shared.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the evolving landscape of gambling opportunities in the United States as it pertains to sports wagering.  
  • Connect evidence to a range of strategies.
  • Explore a rnge of strategies is necessary for an effective public health response. 
Sports Wagering and the Athletes

Jim Brown; Randy Livingston; John Parsons, PhD; Caryl Banks

Experts look at the impact of sports wagering on athletes. Athletes today face unprecedented stress and scrutiny related to gambling. Issues include athletic performance and mental health, social media, integrity, and gambling problems. 

 Learning Objectives:

  • Examine the impact of sports wagering on athletes.
  • Review impacts on athletes of stress, social media, and scrutiny related to gambling.
  • Discuss how gambling-related concerns may impact athletic performance and mental health, integrity, and gambling problems. 

Poster Session Abstracts

Greed in Relation to Problem Gambling: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

Uibin Lee; Devin Mills, PhD; Kelly M. Chroback, PhD

Self-determination theory proposes three causality orientations namely autonomous, controlled, and impersonal that contribute to individuals’ general motivations in life. Previous research has demonstrated that controlled orientation is positively associated with problem gambling. controlled orientation implies a strong motivation to pursue extrinsic rewards and prestige, unlike autonomous orientation, which emphasizes greater self-interest and intrinsic motivation, or impersonal orientation, which underscores a loss of motivation and feeling of helplessness. Research on the psychology of greed (i.e., a strong materialistic desire) offers a novel construct that has not yet been explored in relation to problem gambling and is likely to stem from a stronger controlled orientation. Purpose: The present study tested a conceptual model in which dispositional greed explains the association between controlled orientation and problem gambling severity. Methods: Participants (N = 677; 59.7% male; M = 40.4 years, SD = 12.9) were recruited via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk to complete an online survey. Data: Participants completed the General Causality Orientations Scale, the Greed Scale, and the Problem Gambling Severity Index. Results: Consistent with the hypotheses, dispositional greed partially mediated the association between controlled orientation and problem gambling (B = 0.43, p < 0.001). Conclusions: These are the first findings to show a positive association between greed and problem gambling, as well as the role of greed in mediating the effect of controlled orientation on problem gambling severity. Implications of these findings and future directions are discussed.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the framework of self-determination theory.
  • Learn about the psychological conceptualization of greed.  
  • Learn about the implications for treating a greedy disposition within the context of problem gambling. 
Differences in the History Gambling Treatment Utilization for Latinos and Whites

Abraham Caballero

Gamblers Anonymous (GA) is a 12-step-based self-help program for individuals with gambling problems. When used in conjunction with psychotherapy, GA may help increase abstinence rates up to fourteen months after discharge from treatment. Relative to non-Latino Caucasians, psychotherapy utilization rates are lower for Latinos, and anecdotal reports suggest GA is also used less frequently. The current study explored the impact of GA engagement, defined as having a GA sponsor before intake or during treatment, on participation in a state-funded gambling psychotherapy treatment program by race/ethnicity. Specifically, the study examined if GA engagement or race/ethnic group membership were related to the number of psychotherapy sessions attended. We then explored how the number of sessions attended correlated with treatment outcomes. The data for these analyses were from clients entering treatment between July 1st, 2017, and April 2nd, 2022, and included surveys from three-time points: intake, in-treatment, and end-of-treatment. A total of 2,776 records were included, of which 46% of clients were non-Latino Caucasian, 9% were African-American, 14% were Latino, 18% were API, and 13% were in the Other race/ethnicity category. Results indicated that about 22% of non-Latino Caucasians had a GA sponsor during treatment, which was a higher percentage than each of the other race/ethnic groups, including Latinos. For all groups except African Americans and those in the Other race/ethnicity category, having a GA sponsor increased the average number of sessions attended. This is important because the number of sessions attended correlated with treatment outcomes such as reductions in depression. We integrated work that examined reasons for non-participation in GA among Latinos in our discussion of the study findings.

Learning Objectives:

  • Investigate potential ethnic differences of gambling treatment-seeking individuals.
  • Elaborate on the possible treatment barriers affecting Latino gamblers.
  • Discuss how we can address barriers and promote treatment in the Latino community.
At-Risk and Problem Gambling Among Veterans with Serious Mental Illness

Joseph Deckro; Kendra Pugh

U.S. Veterans diagnosed with serious mental illness (SMI) are vulnerable to comorbid substance use disorders. Research suggests this group is susceptible to comorbid gambling problems, however, no data exists on the pervasiveness of gambling among Veterans with SMI. This study sought to identify prevalence data for problem gambling (PG) among Veterans with SMI and obtain information regarding gambling behaviors by Veterans with SMI. Veterans receiving services related to SMI at the Bedford VAMC completed a self-report questionnaire that collected information about demographics, alcohol and substance use, psychiatric symptoms, problem-gambling severity, compulsive sexual behavior, and type of gambling the Veteran has engaged in. Preliminary analysis shows that while only 4% of the sample had used substances in the past year, 37% of the sample had gambled during the past year. Among the individuals that had gambled in the past year, 62% exhibited at-risk or problem gambling behaviors (23% of the total sample). Of note, 43% of past year gamblers screened positive for PG (16% of the total sample). 50% of past year gamblers reported a VA provider asked them about their gambling. This evidence suggests that while estimated rates of gambling among Veterans with SMI are similar to Veterans receiving behavioral health services at Bedford VAMC (approx. 33%), the consequences of gambling are more severe for Veterans with SMI. Given the severity of MH issues and the vulnerability of this population, identifying Veterans with SMI and PG is important to ensure that they attain access to appropriate treatment.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify prevalence data for the existence of at-risk and problem gambling among Veterans with serious mental illness (SMI) at a VA medical center.
  • Obtain information regarding the type and frequency of gambling behaviors by Veterans with SMI at a VA medical center.
  • Describe the sample of Veterans with SMI that exhibit at-risk and/or problem gambling behavior.
Problem Gambling and Gaming in the Hierarchical Structure of Psychopathology

Jeremie Richard

Research suggests that certain major mental disorders are likely to co-occur among adolescents. Specifically, a two-factor structure emerges when modeling the higher-order structure of psychopathology. Mental disorders tend to be organized into two general dimensions: internalizing (depression and anxiety) and externalizing (aggression, delinquency) disorders. Despite substantial evidence supporting this hierarchical structure, no studies have integrated both recognized behavioral addictions (i.e., gambling and gaming disorder) into this overall model. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to model how symptoms of disordered gambling and disordered gaming fit into the higher-order structure of psychopathology. Survey responses were collected from 6,580 high-school students (50.1% male, Mage = 14.74 years [SD = 1.77]) from Wood County, Ohio. Measures included frequency of gambling, disordered gambling, frequency of video gaming, disordered gaming, depressive symptoms, anxious symptoms, aggressive symptoms, delinquency, and various substance use behaviors (i.e., alcohol, cannabis, tobacco use). The data were fit to a two-factor structure, with disordered gambling symptoms loading most highly on externalizing factors, and disordered gaming symptoms loading equally well on the externalizing and internalizing factors. These findings suggest that during adolescence, gambling problems are best classified and conceptualized in the realm of externalizing disorders, whereas gaming problems may share overlap with both externalizing and internalizing problems. Results also suggest that youth prevention and intervention approaches need to address behavioral addictions early considering the impact of other commonly co-occurring problems.  

Learning Objectives:  

  • Understanding the overarching structure of psychopathology and how it applies to behavioral addictions.  
  • Understanding the classification of mental disorders and how this informs prevention and treatment.
  • Understanding the differences between problem gambling and problem gaming within the overarching structure of psychopathology. 
Eliciting Unique, Individualized Treatment Plans for Sports Bettors in Outpatient Treatment

Daniel Field; David Leong

Utilizing qualitative interviews with five young male problem sports bettors who meet at least five of nine diagnostic criteria for Gambling Disorder (DSM-V), this study looks at the crucial question of effective counseling techniques that result in a substantial reduction of problematic gambling behaviors in individuals who have received at least one-month outpatient treatment in the California Gambling Education and Treatment Services Program. Going beyond the conceptualization of “therapeutic alliance” as the primary determinant in sustaining abstinence from problem gambling, the goal of this qualitative study will examine how other contributing factors such as client’s motivation level, conjoint family sessions, therapeutic modality, involvement in Gamblers Anonymous, experience of the therapist and external factors all contribute to successful outcomes. The study will examine the implementation of individualized treatment planning in outpatient settings and how a “one-size fits all” approach to treatment is not generally as effective as a unique individualized approach that adjusts treatment goals to clients’ stated objectives. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Demonstrate a more thorough understanding of which therapeutic factors and approaches facilitate successful outcomes for problem sports bettors in outpatient settings.
  • Delineate from problem sports bettors which adjunct interventions (notably GA Involvement, Conjoint Family Sessions) contribute to successful outcomes for problem sports bettors in outpatient settings. 
  • Examine and contrast various examples of individualized treatment planning for sports bettors who receive at least one month of outpatient treatment in California Gambling Education and Treatment Services Program. 
Reframing Recovery: Realigning the Message to Reach the Right Audience

Vena Schexnayder

The recovery community is constantly evolving and requires strategic communications and updated resources. Mental health agencies and government organizations must understand the power of social media and various strategies to connect to the recovery community properly. This presentation aims to understand how to reframe the messaging of responsible play and gaming. The audience will learn strategic uses to connect updated messages to engage the recovery community. First, a case study is presented, followed by a review of the strategy and analysis of the ARPG Council organization’s social media to reach the evolving recovery community. The case study results reveal the different techniques that help build and maintain strategic relationships with community stakeholders. The study concludes by discussing the lessons learned from the research: networking and creating relationships with other mental health, legal and financial organizations, increasing brand exposure and collaborations, and focusing more on exciting content to help promote interaction. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Setting Strategic Goals: Learn how to design the steps to create positive communications and resources for the recovery community. 
  • Define the Audience: Learn how to identify the changing needs of your audience to make marketing materials that speak directly to the recovery community.
  • Reaching out to Resources: Learn how to identify out-of-the-box community partners to help strengthen resources. 
Patterns of Community Gambling on Lottery by Zip-Code in Massachusetts

Kendra Pugh

Problem gambling (PG) can have devastating impacts on the gambler and the community. Evidence shows that those that live close to gambling venues, and/or in areas with a high concentration of gambling availability are at greater risk of developing a gambling problem. Studies also show that distribution and concentration of gambling products are significantly associated with areas of socio-economic deprivation, where the negative impacts of this behavior have the greatest impact. Gambling venues like casinos can have negative effects on the surrounding community, but the reach of those harms is limited geographically. However, Massachusetts State Lottery products are broadly dispersed, and the most widely available method of gambling to state residents. Despite the widespread impact and negative effects of problem gambling (PG), limited attention has been paid to the environment where PG is occurring. This presentation will explore the relationship between lottery gambling in Massachusetts and the zip-code where gambling occurs. A geographic analysis using GIS will be conducted to determine if there are patterns between the socioeconomic/built environment of zip-codes and gambling behavior in the community based on per-capita lottery sales. Knowledge of where the at-risk locations for PG are concentrated and the general status of their circumstances is important to identify where public health resources and interventions are needed. The results of this investigation will be mapped to pinpoint the concentration of high-risk areas. The resulting product will be useful for prioritizing public health funding and targeting prevention interventions. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Critically evaluate factors and conditions related to matters of problem gambling and responsible gambling. 
  • Gain knowledge on problem gambling from a public health perspective on prevention, community, and resources for treatment. 
  • Discover methods and information that will help to improve community health and wellness by identifying and targeting at-risk communities with problem gambling treatment and prevention funding. 
National Problem Gambling Helpline – Solving the Puzzle of Modernization

Jaime Costello

As the National Council on Problem Gambling launches its modernization of the National Problem Gambling Helpline, many questions come to the surface.  What exactly does “modernization” mean? Why is the project happening? How will the modernization impact service for callers? What does this project mean for state affiliates and call centers? What’s my role in this project? Visit our poster session during the National Conference on Gambling Addiction & Responsible Gambling 2022 to see an illustration of the full Modernization Project process. Data demonstrating project needs will be displayed alongside details for each piece of the puzzle, an organic project timeline and answers to your most burning questions. Staff will be on hand during each poster session timeslot to shed light on everything related to the National Problem Gambling Helpline Modernization Project. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the need for modernization of the National Problem Gambling Helpline
  • Recall the overarching goals of the National Problem Gambling Helpline Modernization Project
  • Articulate the foundational pieces of the National Problem Gambling Helpline Modernization Project